Post brings the usual questions, and some new ones / by KirstenStudio

John-Margo3It's that time in a production's life when primary photography has been completed and it's time to devote almost all one's hours toward the edit. Beginning post production is exciting, but also daunting. Hopefully footage has been brought into the project and logged, and interviews transcribed as the shoots have taken place. Hopefully the spreadsheets and budgets are updated, you've been reviewing footage as you've shot, and gotten into some cutting already. These are 'hopefully' scenarios, however, as more often than not (in my experience), these tasks are ideally done during the shooting phase, but sometimes they are just partially completed by the real edit time. In my case, most of the above is complete, but not all, and although I've watched the footage after each shoot, I now need to sit down and review everything again beforeJohn_Jane_TimesSquare digging in for the long editing haul. It can be tedious, but also exciting when gems you didn't realize (or remembered) existed in the footage materialize, even though you were there when it was recorded. Seemingly unimportant comments, behaviors or imagery can suddenly reveal themselves as insightful and telling. These are the essential moments for any sort of storytelling, big or small. After all, when it comes to most nonfiction narratives, post is when the story is crafted. Although this phase is my favorite, and I've been on enough productions now to know the nuts and bolts of how to tackle it, there are new questions on the horizon. For instance, once this story is complete, there are a number of traditional ways of getting it out into the world, but also a few new choices which are as confusing as they are thrilling to consider. New venues, new models, new avenues for impact - there are a lot of decisions to be made and each one seems to be on a case-by-case basis. What is one's story most suited for?

This particular project will be a short, but never-the-less, it required scanning many-a still images (over 1,000) and shooting many hours of happenings. In my case (any many other filmmakers) this is done in tandem with other documentary and commercial freelance jobs, and therefore takes twice as long to finish. The project has yet to go through various phases and versions with feedback, recuts and consultations. As the post production phase begins, thoughts about the end plan (and budget) continue to change and morph as I consider the footage I have and the story I believe will come of it.

LQ_Luncheon2014With the landscape of documentary distribution in such flux (more opportunity in many ways, yet more competition), who knows what distribution will look like next year, or even 6 to 8 months from now. Documentary storytellers are on the rise, but with the market saturated with content, how will smaller projects, such as this one, get seen? How will it be monetized and how will its lifespan be maximized? These are questions I'm still kicking around, even at this point in the production, and one that will of course inform the end cut.

The International Documentary Association will put on their annual conference in Los Angeles in a couple of weeks and will be addressing some of these questions for mid-career documentary media makers. The Documentary Film Conference 2014, Getting Real three day event boasts keynote speakers Morgan Spurlock, Tabitha Jackson, Cara Mertes, Dawn Porter and Lucy Walker (notice the ratio of women to men. Thank you, IDA!). Panels includes Getting Real About The Doc Career, Let's Make This Perfectly Clear (on digital distribution), When Impact Meets Distribution, Creative Money Balance: A Hands-on Workshop on Career Sustainability and Personal Finance, From Distribution to Sustainability: Four Doc Filmmaker Case Studies. Also included are forums, screenings and case studies. With the state of documentary growing in leaps and bounds, but documentary making as a viable, full time sustainable career at risk, the Getting Real 2014 should prove to be an informative one. See you there.